• Dave LeGear

Caring For Your Camera near Salt Water.


I cannot think short of an active Volcano, or maybe a Cat 5 Hurricane (which is full of Saltwater by the way) of a more corrosive environment to operate any gear. Much less, these small computers with a lens mounted on them, than on or near any Marine Ecosystem!


Here is a good little video I found that has some useful tips on how to help keep your expensive camera gear in good shape:


Then it is ready to grab a shot of that Tarpon launching out of the water like a Space Shuttle. This or another relaxing sunset photo suitable to use for a framed picture back home, or just for some PC or Mobile device as wallpaper for nice memory of the "Places you would rather be" right now.

Some other ways I help combat such conditions, but still have quick access. Is the use of a quality camera sling type of bag that is well built, and sheds water so it does not even get near your expensive gear while traveling along in your Bay Boat, Skiff or even on a Paddle-craft like the East Cape SKANU.

Now the advantage of the sling bag is size. This since you can carry (pending on the one you select of course) the camera body, along with your favorite all-around zoom lens already attached should fit inside. This with maybe a second wide angle zoom lens also in the same bag for quick changes.


My personal favorite (love that lens) is the wide angle NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S that fits in my sling bag at the same time. Some of the low light pictures it has been able to take with it and my Z6, have been stunning and even handheld. I just take pictures using the same breathing methods, like one would for long range rifle shooting (the other Veterans here know what I mean) and I also program a half second or more of delay for shutter release after I push the button. Now, will this method suffice for the lack of a tripod or even a mono pod onboard? Not really, but it will buy you some time as the Sun sets before having to break one out. Then again having a Tripod or even a Mono-pod onboard is usually not much help and if I do, it's for use once I stake off the Skiff and set up on some sandbar or Island.


So, for these secure storage and quick access needs, I really like the Peak Design 6L Sling Bag. Now, I am carrying around the Nikon Mirrorless Z body / lens system which is thinner in overall size.

For those shooting a larger / full framed DSLR body and lens. This knowing how tight my 6L bag is now, I would highly recommend moving up to the 10L size bag. Matter of fact, I am thinking of moving up the 10L myself to give me the option of having a third lens.


This sling bag system though, allows you to have your camera, keys, wallet, and such like. All in one bag and hanging off your console within easy reach. And if it does start to rain or the spray kicks up while running the heavy chop. The bag material it has, will buy you plenty of time to grab it and put it inside one of your hatches, just for a extra measure of protection.


Here is a video overview below on the Peak Design Sling Bag that does a good job of covering all the features and benefits that it has. Now, it might not be the perfect bag for you and your needs. However, for my use case on the Skiff, as well as my EDC system works well! Something you may want to review and if nothing else, compare to others on the market for your needs.


If you would like to find out more about the Peak Design Sling Bag or other awesome Peak Design Gear, just click on the picture below.




Hope this helps give you some ideas on how keep your gear both secure, and dry, and ready to use at a seconds moment in a very harsh environment all at the same time.

Now you can order your own to try and have it shipped right to your location, simply by clicking on any of the product pictures seen above...

Good Shooting, and God Bless!

Dave


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